February 3, 2008: Grassy Meadows Cheese May Be Contaminated With Staph

Public health officials are warning consumers in Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan not to consume certain cheeses produced by Grassy Meadows Dairy, Howe Indiana, because the cheese may be contaminated with the foodborne pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus. Healthcare professionals often refer to the bacterium and its disease as “staph” and “staph food poisoning”.

Affected products include, but are not limited to:

  • Colby, lots 210317 and 19177
  • Jalapeno Natural, lots 2617, 21017, and 11017
  • “Homemade,” lots 19267 and 19227
  • Monterey Jack, lots 18207 and 2937
  • Garlic Pepper, lot 19147

The cheeses were sold as wedges of block of various weights.

According to an Indiana State press release:

Due to the nature of the manufacturing process for raw milk cheese, BOAH [Indiana State Board of Animal Health] advises consumers not to eat any cheese from this facility purchased prior to January 30, 2008. According to Terry Philibeck, Director of BOAH Dairy Divison, the agency has not yet been able to identify when the staph contamination began. Cheese purchased prior to January may be contaminated.

Grassy Meadows products were sold directly to consumers from the dairy farm, located in LaGrange County, Ind., as well as more than a dozen retail health food stores in Northeastern/Fort Wayne Indiana region. BOAH is working to secure a complete list of retails outlets that carry this product.

For more information about staph food poisoning, please see About Staph and Staph Food Poisoning Symptoms.  You can also visit our website www.foodpoisoning.com for more information about this and other forms of food poisoning.

If you or a loved one has been harmed by staph or any other form of food poisoning, and you would like to know more about your legal rights, you can contact the Law Offices of Eric H. Weinberg by clicking Free Case Evaluation. You can also call us toll-free at 1-877-934-6274. For more information about our law firm, please see Food Poisoning Lawyer.

 

284 comments February 3rd, 2008

December 26, 2007: A Very Long List of 2007 Food Poisoning Outbreaks and Recalls Gives Pause During This Holiday Season

Anyone who has been paying attention to the news knows that there has been an outrageous number of food poisoning outbreaks and recalls in the U.S. over the past year. But a look at the list is still a sobering experience.

Whether the reported cases of food poisoning (and let’s not forget – many cases go unreported) involved Salmonella or E. coli or botulism; whether they were linked with a specific restaurant, a restaurant chain, a meat manufacturer, a produce grower or a retail store; the result was the same – people became ill and some of the most unfortunate lost their lives.

The recent spate of food poisoning outbreaks can be traced back to the late summer and early fall of 2006, when almost 200 people became ill after eating bagged spinach. That’s where we end our list of outbreaks and recalls, which is presented below in reverse chronological order.

For more information about many of these food poisoning outbreaks and food recalls, please see the following websites: www.foodpoisoning.com, www.salmonellalawsuit.com, www.ecolilawsuit.com, www.cryptosporidiumlawsuit.com, www.giardialawsuit.com, www.botulismlegalhelp.com, and www.staphlawsuit.com. To learn more about our law firm, visit www.erichweinberg.com.

[Please note that given the large number of outbreaks and recalls, it is impossible to present a complete list.]

2007

  • December 2007: Three dozen Salmonella food poisoning cases reported in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Idaho; link sought by health officials
  • November 2007: American Foods Group recalls almost 100,000 pounds of ground beef due to possible E. coli contamination
  • November 2007: 176 people develop symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning in connection with a Newton (Catawba County), North Carolina, Mexican restaurant, Carniceria y Taqueria Hermanos Chavez
  • November 2007: Double B Foods, Inc., of Meridian, Texas, recalls approximately 98,000 pounds of frozen sausage roll products that may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes
  • November 2007: Cargill Meat Solutions Corp. recalls approximately 1,084,384 pounds of ground beef products; possible E. coli O157:H7 contamination
  • November 2007: Generals Mills recalls approximately 3.3 million pounds of frozen meat pizza products with possible E. coli O157:H7 contamination
  • November 2007: Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection issues boil water notice for some water customers in Mercer County due to high Giardia counts in the Shenango River
  • November 2007: Shigellosis, a foodborne illness caused by Shigella bacteria, confirmed in fourteen individuals at Roberts Elementary School in Wisconsin
  • October 2007: Kroger brand seafood dips recalled for possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination
  • October 2007: Blue Ribbon Meats recalls some frozen ground beef products due to possibility of E. coli O157:H7 contamination
  • October 2007: Class I recall of 173,554 pounds of J & B Meats Corporation ground beef hamburger patties; possible contamination with E. coli O157:H7
  • October 2007: Arko Veal Co. recalls approximately 1,900 pounds of ground beef patties mix that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H
  • October 2007: ConAgra recalls all Banquet and generic brand frozen chicken and turkey pot pies; link to 272 cases of Salmonella food poisoning in 35 states
  • October 2007: Salmonella-contaminated tomatoes cause food poisoning outbreak that sickens more than 20 customers and employees at Quiznos Subs in Rochester, Minnesota
  • October 2007: Topps Meat Company recalls hundreds of thousands of pounds of ground beef with possible E. coli contamination; second largest beef recall in U.S. history
  • October 2007: Salmonella food poisoning outbreak, with 67 reported cases, in Newton County, Georgia, linked to pulled pork sold by the Covington Lions Club at Sherman’s Last Burning barbeque festival
  • October 2007: Kraft Foods Inc. recalls 6 oz packages of Baker’s Premium White Chocolate due to possible Salmonella contamination
  • October 2007: Aliki Foods, Inc., of Old Lyme, Conn., recalls approximately 70,400 pounds of chicken and pasta products that may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes
  • October 2007: Spanaway Water Company in Washington issues boil water notice due to E. coli contamination; area schools closed
  • September 2007: Confirmed cases of E. coli food poisoning in children attending schools in New Albany-Floyd County Public School District in Indiana
  • September 2007: Piggly Wiggly markets in Wisconsin recall ground beef after two cases of E. coli food poisoning
  • September 2007: Castleberry Foods recalls over 25 brands of canned foods, including chili sauce, because of possible botulism contamination
  • September 2007: Dole Food Co. recalls Hearts Delight salad mix after sample taken from store in Canada tests positive for E. coli.
  • September 2007: FDA warns consumers not to consume “Organic Pastures Raw Cream”; risk of Listeria contamination
  • September 2007: Stew Leonard’s Supermarket in Westchester County, New York, recalls 96% lean ground round meat following report of three cases of E. coli food poisoning
  • September 2007: Baby’s Bliss Gripe Water recalled for possible Cryptosporidium contamination
  • September 2007: Fairbank Reconstruction Corp., Ashville, N.Y., recalls approximately 884 pounds of ground beef products with possible E. coli O157:H7 contamination
  • August 2007: Over 1,300 cases of cryptosporidiosis resulting from Cryptosporidium bacteria reported in Utah; leads to swimming restrictions
  • August 2007: Metz Fresh LLC of King City, California, recalls over 8,000 cases of fresh, bagged spinach for possible Salmonella contamination
  • August 2007: Eight cases of E. coli illness in children in Eagle County, Colorado, possibly linked to Eagle Pool
  • August 2007: Arby’s restaurant in Moses Lake (Grant County), Washington, closed after 17 cases of Salmonella food poisoning; meat slicer implicated as in case of Arby’s restaurant in Valdosta, Georgia (see below)
  • August 2007: Mars Petcare U.S. recalls Krasdale Gravy Dry Dog Food and fifty-pound bags of Red Flannel Large Adult Formula dry dog food after positive tests for Salmonella; 66 reported human cases of illness
  • August 2007: Cloud’s Food Service recalls 4,200 tuna and egg salad sandwiches that may contain the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes
  • August 2007: Consumers warned to avoid eating raw oysters from southern tip of Hood Canal in Washington State; warning later expanded to all of Hood Canal
  • August 2007: FDA warns of potential botulism risk from canned French cut green beans; product marketed under a variety of brand names
  • July 2007: Okmulgee County (Oklahoma) Family YMCA pool identified as source of waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium; over 95 individuals stricken with diarrhea
  • July 2007: Custom Pack, Inc., of Hastings, Nebraska, recalls approximately 5,920 pounds of ground beef and buffalo products with risk of E. coli O157:H7 contamination
  • July 2007: Abbott’s Meat Inc., Flint, Michigan, recalls approximately 26,669 pounds of ground beef products; risk of E. coli contamination
  • July 2007: Cryptosporidium, Giardia and norovirus responsible for illness in almost 200 people (123 children) connected with West Chester University pool in Pennsylvania
  • July 2007: Castleberry hot dog chili sauce and other products marketed under a variety of brand names recalled due to possible botulism contamination
  • July 2007: 70 inmates at Jefferson County Jail in Colorado become ill from exposure to E. coli bacteria
  • July 2007: Little Rosie’s Taqueria in Huntsville, Alabama, source of E. coli outbreak that sickens 18
  • July 2007: Salmonella outbreak affects 636 people; outbreak linked to Pars Cove Persian Cuisine booth at the Taste of Chicago Food Festival
  • June 2007: State of Tennessee Cook Chill recalls approximately 2,768 pounds of ready-to-eat chicken products that may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes
  • June 2007: Six people contract E. coli at Rexbury, Idaho, spray park
  • June 2007: Veggie Booty Snack Food recalled; Salmonella contamination found
  • June 2007: United Food Group, based in California, recalls 5.7 million pounds of fresh and frozen ground beef; possible contamination with E. coli
  • June 2007: Tyson Fresh Meats in Sherman, Texas, recalls over 40,000 pounds of packaged ground beef as a result of possible E. coli O157:H7 contamination
  • June 2007: Captain’s Galley, a China Grove, North Carolina, seafood restaurant, is source of E. coli outbreak that sickens 21; one death results from complications of E. coli infection
  • June 2007: Really Cool Food Company, Syosset, New York, recalls approximately 140 pounds of chicken products; possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination
  • May 2007: Minnesota meat packer PM Holdings recalls 117,500 pounds of beef trim products after seven cases of E. coli food poisoning reported in Minnesota
  • May 2007: Davis Creek Meats and Seafood, Kalamazoo, Michigan, recalls 129,000 pounds of beef with possible E. coli O157:H7
  • May 2007: Diestel Turkey Ranch, of Chinese Camp, California, recalls approximately 6,907 pounds of ready-to-eat turkey products with possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination
  • April 2007: Richwood Meat Company recalls 107,943 pounds of frozen ground beef; E. coli contamination suspected
  • April 2007: Souplantation restaurant in Lake Forest, California, closed by health officials after 14 become ill with E. coli symptoms
  • April 2007: Earle of Sausage, of Willernie, Minnesota, recalls approximately 330 pounds of ready-to-eat sausage products that may contain Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin
  • March 2007: FDA warns consumers not to frink “Jermuk” brand mineral water
  • March 2007: FDA investigates norovirus outbreak linked to oysters
  • March 2007: Tyson Fresh Meats, a unit of Tyson Foods, Inc., recalls 16,743 pounds of ground beef for possible contamination with E. coli O157:H7
  • February 2007: First Quality Sausage, Las Vegas, Nevada, recalls approximately 930 pounds of semi-boneless ham steaks that may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes
  • February 2007: Carolina Culinary Foods, of West Columbia, S.C., recalls fully cooked Oscar Mayer/Louis Rich chicken breast cuts and strips as a result of possible contaminatiAnyone who has been paying attention to the news knows that there has been an outrageous number of food poisoning outbreaks and recalls in the U.S. over the past year. on with Listeria monocytogenes
  • February 2007: Earth’s Best Organic 2 Apple Peach Barley Wholesome Breakfast baby food recalled for possible contamination with botulism
  • February 2007: Castle Produce recalls 560 cartons of cantaloupes for possible Salmonella contamination
  • February 2007: BJ’s recalls Wellsley Farms brand mushrooms, which may contain trace amounts of E. coli
  • February 2007: Since August, number of Salmonella food poisoning cases linked with Peter Pan Peanut Butter and Great Value Peanut Butter reaches 425 in 44 states
  • January 2007:Gold Star Sausage Co., Inc, Denver, Colorado, recalls approximately 15,514 pounds of sausage products that may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes

2006

  • December 2006: FDA investigates norovirus outbreak linked to oysters December 2006: Taco Bell restaurants in New York and New Jersey linked with E. Coli food poisoning in 39 people
  • November 2006: HoneyBaked Foods Inc., of Holland, Ohio, recalls approximately 46,941 pounds of cooked ham and turkey products that may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes
  • October 2006: Omaha Beef Company, Inc., Danbury, Connecticut, recalls approximately 1,680 pounds of ground beef products; possible E. coli O157:H7 contamination
  • October 2006: Herman Falter Packing Co., Columbus, Ohio, recalls approximately 1,178 pounds of various pork products; possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination
  • September 2006: Bagged spinach packaged by Natural Selection Foods and probably supplied by Earthbound Farm in California source of E. coli outbreak sickening 198 people, with 3 deaths
  • August-October 2006: Arby’s restaurant in Valdosta (Lowndes County), Georgia, linked to 72 cases of Salmonella food poisoning

258 comments December 26th, 2007

September 12, 2007: Wash Your Hands, Don’t Toss the Food and Other Helpful Hints Regarding Staph Food Poisoning

During the summer of 1998, half of the 8000 people who attended a Catholic ordination celebration in Brazil became ill with food poisoning caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The cause of the outbreak was later traced to the food handlers, who tested positive for staph.

Over 1300 Texas elementary school children suffered from staph food poisoning after eating a school lunch of chicken salad. Even though the chickens used in the salad had been boiled for 3 hours, they became contaminated when they were subsequently deboned by food preparers.

Clearly, large numbers of people can fall victim to food poisoning caused by staphylococcal toxins, and diners are at the mercy of food preparers and handlers when it comes to staph contamination. In fact, foods that require a lot of handling during preparation are often implicated in staph food poisoning. Also, when food is kept warm after handling, that creates an environment in which staph bacteria can multiply.

Ham is the food most commonly linked with staph food poisoning, but the list also includes other meats and dairy products. Contaminated tuna, chicken, egg and “picnic” salads, such as potato and macaroni, may cause staph poisoning, as may cream-filled bakery items.

The food preparation step is implicated in staph contamination because staphylococcal bacteria can be found on the skin and in the nose and throat of over 50% of healthy individuals. When proper hygiene isn’t practiced the bacteria can be transferred to food and through food to the eater.

Before it can be determined if a handler or handlers have contaminated a particular dish, tests have to be done to find out whether a case of food poisoning has been caused by staph. For that reason, it is imperative that any food that may be linked to food poisoning NOT be thrown out. That food should be tested for the presence of staphylococci.

Even the most careful individuals can be harmed by food poisoning, but efforts can be made to reduce the risk. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend the following preventative measures:

  • Wash hands and under fingernails vigorously with soap and water before handling and preparing food.
  • Do not prepare food if you have a nose or eye infection.
  • Do not prepare or serve food for others if you have wounds or skin infections on your hands or wrists.
  • Keep kitchens and food-serving areas clean and sanitized.
  • If food is to be stored longer than two hours, keep hot foods hot (over 140°F) and cold foods cold (40°F or under).
  • Store cooked food in a wide, shallow container and refrigerate as soon as possible.

For more information about staph food poisoning, please visit the following pages of this website: “About Staphylococcus aureus” and “Common Symptoms and Complications.” You can also visit the website www.foodpoisoning.com for more information about this and other forms of food poisoning, as well as about recent food poisoning outbreaks.

If you or a loved one has been harmed by staph or any other form of food poisoning, and you would like to know more about your legal rights, you can contact the Law Offices of Eric H. Weinberg for a free case evaluation. You can also call us toll-free at 1-877-934-6274. For more information about our law firm, please visit www.erichweinberg.com.

For news on recent food poisoning outbreaks, please see Salmonella Pot Pies, Pot Pie Recall, Banquet Pot Pie Recall, and Topps Hamburger Recall. For information about the recent General Mills pizza recall, please visit any of our other sites dedicated to food poisoning law at Pizza Recall, Pizza E. coli, and E. coli Lawyer.

319 comments September 12th, 2007

About Staphylococcus

Staphylococcal food poisoning is caused by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Found on the skin and in the nasal passages of up to 50 % of healthy people, this bacterium is unique in its ability to make different toxins that are responsible for causing food poisoning.

Healthcare professionals may refer to the bacterium and its disease as “staph” or “staph food poisoning.”

Individuals infected with staph may experience nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, diarrhea, headache, fever, chills, weakness, and dizziness within 1 to 6 hours after eating contaminated food.

Staphylococcal food poisoning occurs when an individual eats food contaminated with toxins produced by the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium.

Food initially becomes contaminated with Staphylococcus through contact with a contaminated work surface, or, most typically, by contact with food workers who carry the bacteria on their skin. For this reason, it is crucial that food workers practice good hand hygiene and wear gloves while handling food to reduce risk.

Food can also become cross-contaminated by coming into contact with contaminated milk or cheese. The bacteria can then multiply in the food and produce the toxin that causes illness. Staphylococcal toxins are resistant to heat and cannot be destroyed by cooking.

Foods that pose the greatest risk are those that are prepared by hand, do not require cooking as part of their preparation, and are then left at room temperature giving the bacteria time to grow and produce toxins. Commonly implicated foods include sandwiches, meats, egg products, tuna, chicken, macaroni, and potato salads. Also, cream-filled pastries, pies, and milk and dairy products may be implicated.

The information contained on this page has been gathered from the websites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration and other sources in the public domain.

September 3rd, 2007

Common Symptoms and Complications

Symptoms and Complications of Staphylococcal Food Poisoning

Symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, diarrhea, headache, fever, chills, weakness, and dizziness. Symptoms may occur in as little as 30 minutes after ingesting food contaminated with Staphylococcal toxin. Typically, symptoms will develop within 1 to 6 hours after eating contaminated food.

The onset of complications and the severity of the illness may depend on an individual’s response to the toxin, the amount of toxin present in the food, the amount of food consumed, and the age and overall health of the individual.

As with most foodborne illnesses, the young, the elderly, and those in poor health are more likely to suffer severe illness requiring intravenous therapy and hospitalization. Since the toxin is not affected by antibiotics, these medications are of no use in treating Staphylococcal food poisoning.

Free Case Evaluation

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg currently represents victims of food poisoning outbreaks throughout the country. If you or a family member has suffered from Staphlococcal food poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, you can request a free case evaluation from our firm by clicking on free case evaluation. You may also contact us toll free at 1-877-934-6274. To learn more about Staphylococcus aureus, food poisoning, and food poisoning law, please visit FoodPoisoning.com.

The information contained on this page has been gathered from the websites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration and other sources in the public domain.

1 comment September 2nd, 2007

Next Posts Previous Posts


Categories

Links